Dispatches for the New York Tribune

Karl Marx
1870: German social, political and economic theorist Karl Marx (1818 – 1883) the inspiration of modern international communism. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Born in Trier in the Rhineland in 1818, Karl Marx was the son of a Jewish lawyer recently converted to Christianity. As a student in Bonn and Berlin, Marx studied law and then philosophy. He joined with the Young Hegelians, the most radical of Hegel’s followers, in denying that Hegel’s philosophy could be reconciled with Christianity or the existing State. Forced out of university by his radicalism, he became a journalist and, soon after, a socialist. He left Prussia for Paris and then Brussels, where he stayed until 1848. In 1844 he began his collaboration with Friedrich Engels and developed a new theory of communism to be brought into being by a proletarian revolution. This theory was brilliantly outlined in The Communist Manifesto. Marx participated in the 1848 revolutions as a newspaper editor in Cologne. Exiled together with his family to London, he tried to make a living writing for the New York Tribune and other journals, but remained financially dependent on Engels. His researches in the British Museum were aimed at underpinning his conception of communism with a theory of history that demonstrated that capitalism was a transient economic form destined to break down and be superseded by a society without classes, private property or state authority. This study was never completed, but its first part, which was published as Capital in 1867, established him as the principal theorist of revolutionary socialism. He died in London in 1883.

Dispatches for the New York Tribune

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The Practice and Theory of Bolshevism

Bolshevism
Bolshevism

I cannot share the hopes of the Bolsheviks any more than those of the Egyptian anchorites; I regard both as tragic delusions, destined to bring upon the world centuries of darkness and futile violence. The principles of the Sermon on the Mount are admirable, but their effect upon average human nature was very different from what was intended. Those who followed Christ did not learn to love their enemies or to turn the other cheek. They learned instead to use the Inquisition and the stake, to subject the human intellect to the yoke of an ignorant and intolerant priesthood, to degrade art and extinguish science for a thousand years. These were the inevitable results, not of the teaching, but of fanatical belief in the teaching. The hopes which inspire Communism are, in the main, as admirable as those instilled by the Sermon on the Mount, but they are held as fanatically, and are likely to do as much harm. Cruelty lurks in our instincts, and fanaticism is a camouflage for cruelty. Fanatics are seldom genuinely humane, and those who sincerely dread cruelty will be slow to adopt a fanatical creed. I do not know whether Bolshevism can be prevented from acquiring universal power. But even if it cannot, I am persuaded that those who stand out against it, not from love of ancient injustice, but in the name of the free spirit of Man, will be the bearers of the seeds of progress, from which, when the world’s gestation is accomplished, new life will be born.

The Practice and Theory of Bolshevism

Israel Dual Citizenships

US Senators and Representatives Dual Israel Citizens
US Senators and Representatives Dual Israel Citizens

If an Israeli puts America first are they consider anti-Semite.

Corporate U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives that are Israel Dual Citizens. each SENATOR and REPRESENTATIVE is its own UNIQUE Legal Presence Artificial Person. That is to say, because of the nature of the OFFICE a suitable Insurance Franchise needs to be created in their “legal fiction” Trade Name.

28 U.S. Code § 3002 

(15)United States” means—

(A) a Federal corporation;

(B) an agencydepartment, commission, board, or other entity of the United States; or

Protocols of Zion

Protocols of Zion
Protocols of Zion

In 1884 the daughter of a Russian general, Mlle. Justine Glinka, was endeavoring to serve her country in Paris by obtaining political information, which she communicated to General Orgevskii in St. Petersburg. For this purpose she employed a Jew, Joseph Schorst, member of the Mizraim Lodge in Paris. One day Schorst offered to obtain for her a document of great importance to Russia, on payment of 2,500 francs. This sum being received from St. Petersburg was paid over and the document handed to Mlle. Glinka. She forwarded the French original, accompanied by a Russian translation, to Orgevskii, who in turn handed it to his chief, General Cherevin, for transmission to the Tsar. But Cherevin, under obligation to wealthy Jews, refused to transmit it, merely filing it in the archives.

The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion

Protocols of Zion

666 Six Pointed Star

star-of-david1
Star of the Kenites

Equilateral Triangle

DOWNLOAD Mathematica Notebook EXPLORE THIS TOPIC IN the MathWorld ClassroomEquilateralTriangle

An equilateral triangle is a triangle with all three sides of equal length a, corresponding to what could also be known as a “regular” triangle. An equilateral triangle is therefore a special case of an isosceles triangle having not just two, but all three sides equal. An equilateral triangle also has three equal 60 degrees angles.

The altitude h of an equilateral triangle is

 h=asin60 degrees=1/2sqrt(3)a,
(1)

where a is the side length, so the area is

 A=1/2ah=1/4sqrt(3)a^2.
(2)

EqTriangleInscribeCirc

The inradius rcircumradius R, and area A can be computed directly from the formulas for a general regular polygon with side length a and n=3 sides,

r = 1/2acot(pi/3)
(3)
= 1/2atan(pi/6)
(4)
= 1/6sqrt(3)a
(5)
R = 1/2acsc(pi/3)
(6)
= 1/2asec(pi/6)
(7)
= 1/3sqrt(3)a
(8)
A = 1/4na^2cot(pi/3)
(9)
= 1/4sqrt(3)a^2.
(10)

The areas of the incircle and circumcircle are

A_r = pir^2
(11)
= 1/(12)pia^2
(12)
A_R = piR^2
(13)
= 1/3pia^2.
(14)

Central triangles that are equilateral include the circumnormal trianglecircumtangential trianglefirst Morley triangleinner Napoleon triangleouter Napoleon trianglesecond Morley triangleStammler triangle, and third Morley triangle.

EquilateralTriangleEquation

An equation giving an equilateral triangle with R=1 is given by

 max(-2y,y-xsqrt(3),y+xsqrt(3))=1.
(15)

EquilateralTriangleConst

Geometric construction of an equilateral consists of drawing a diameter of a circle OP_O and then constructing its perpendicular bisector P_3OB. Bisect OB in point D, and extend the line P_1P_2 through D. The resulting figure P_1P_2P_3 is then an equilateral triangle. An equilateral triangle may also be constructed from the intersections of the angle trisectors of the three interior angles of any triangles (Morley’s theorem).

Napoleon’s theorem states that if three equilateral triangles are drawn on the legs of any triangle (either all drawn inwards or outwards) and the centers of these triangles are connected, the result is another equilateral triangle.

Given the distances of a point from the three corners of an equilateral triangle, ab, and c, the length of a side s is given by

 3(a^4+b^4+c^4+s^4)=(a^2+b^2+c^2+s^2)^2
(16)

(Gardner 1977, pp. 56-57 and 63). There are infinitely many solutions for which ab, and c are integers. In these cases, one of abc, and s is divisible by 3, one by 5, one by 7, and one by 8 (Guy 1994, p. 183).

Begin with an arbitrary triangle and find the excentral triangle. Then find the excentral triangle of that triangle, and so on. Then the resulting triangle approaches an equilateral triangle. The only rational triangle is the equilateral triangle (Conway and Guy 1996). A polyhedron composed of only equilateral triangles is known as a deltahedron.

TriangleCircumRect

Let any rectangle be circumscribed about an equilateral triangle. Then

 X+Y=Z,
(17)

where XY, and Z are the areas of the triangles in the figure (Honsberger 1985).

EqTriangleSquare

The smallest equilateral triangle which can be inscribed in a unit square (left figure) has side length and area

s = 1
(18)
A = 1/4sqrt(3) approx 0.4330.
(19)

The largest equilateral triangle which can be inscribed (right figure) is oriented at an angle of 15 degrees and has side length and area

s = sec(15 degrees)=sqrt(6)-sqrt(2)
(20)
A = 2sqrt(3)-3 approx 0.4641
(21)

(Madachy 1979).

Greater Israel Project

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Greater Israel Project

Oded Yinon, whose 1982 paper for Kivunim (Directions) entitled “A Strategy for Israel in the 1980s”, is often used as a reference point for evidence of an Israeli aim to balkanise the surrounding Arab and Muslim world into ethnic and sectarian mini-states, was recently interviewed. He discussed the notoriety of the document which came to a wider audience a few years later after it was translated into English by Israel Shahak.

But while Yinon down plays the specific application of his paper to actual geopolitical events, the ideas posited in his article have arguably formed an enduring central policy plank of the Zionist state; balkanisation having been a necessary condition first in creating the modern state of Israel, and thereafter as a means of ensuring its survival and maintaining its military dominance in the Middle East.

The Zionist Plan for the Middle East

The Invention Of The Jewish People

Greater Israel Project and Balkanization of Syria